Category: Information Architecture


You’re reading this: the case for content strategy

I’m going to share a secret from nearly twenty years of working on the web. Peel the lid back on a major website build, and you’d be forgiven for wondering whether the efforts going into planning, creating and managing the written word are commensurate with the effort going into technical or structural aspects of the project. Put another way: visitors to a site are there for the content. Those who build sites end up putting plenty of time into other aspects of the project first. So why aren’t we putting more effort where the impact is greatest?

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Managing Electronic Records Conference (MER) 2016

Last week I spent a very fun and engaging  time at the Managing Electronic Records (MER) Conference. The MER conference is held annually in downtown Chicago and brings together the different kinds of information management lifecycle experts from the legal, Records and Information Management (RIM), and IT fields to discuss the latest approaches in electronic information management. I was glad I met a long-time friend of mine who’d gone on to become an employment lawyer (his Homepage website here), and gained a pretty deep insight from him, which would later come in handy for me when I’d start business.

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GC Web Usability Resolution 2: Think by topic, not owner.

(part 2 of 5)

Historically a common tendency when architecting government websites, especially intranet sites, has been to organize information by the structure of the institution, or rather, by who owns the information. At first glance this can often seem like a logical approach to organizing web content. And although we are getting much better at moving away from this type of web information architecture (IA); there do, however, remain a number of problems with organizing web content by organizational design that we should keep in mind.

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